LBWMF: Rays 7, Astros 3

This! (Photo Credit: Tampa Bay Rays)

The days of restless anticipation are over, as the Tampa Bay Rays finally punched their postseason ticket — their fourth consecutive playoff berth — after they defeated the Astros on Friday, 7-3.

At 86-71, the Rays enter play 15 games above .500 with five left to play. The goal now is to improve where they are seeded so they don’t have to face the Guardians on Friday, in Cleveland.

Drew Rasmussen allowed two earned runs on five hits (including a solo homer to Alex Bregman) and no walks while striking out three over seven innings on Friday in Houston. Rasmussen continued his fantastic campaign with a win over the best team in the American League to clinch the Rays a postseason birth. Rasmussen was incredibly efficient, throwing just 73 pitches (52 strikes, 71% strike rate). The right-hander has shown excellent control this season, walking only 31 batters in 146 innings. He is tentatively slated to make one last regular season tuneup in Boston on Wednesday. Overall, Rasmussen owns a 2.84 ERA and a 3.25 FIP, with a 4.03 K/BB, and a 1.04 FIP on the season.

Yandy Díaz returned to the lineup and was a major factor in the contest, going 3-for-4 with two RBI.

He walked in the first inning, then found himself on third with two outs when Harold Ramírez singled him home to open the scoring.

In the fifth inning, Díaz hit a one-out single off Framber Valdez, then came around to score on Randy Arozarena’s triple to center. Wander Franco drove Arozarena home with a single to put the Rays up by one.

The Rays broke things open in the sixth inning. Francisco Mejía led off the frame with a base hit before Isaac Paredes worked a full-count walk. José Siri, in the midst of his revenge tour against his former team, doubled in Mejía to make it 4-2.

After a fielder’s choice at home, Díaz lashed a two-run double to put Tampa Bay up by four.

Taylor Walls capped the scoring for the Rays in the eighth inning, crushing a solo blast to deep right field, and putting them up by five.

Even though Colin Poche gave back a run on an RBI double in the ninth, that is as close as Houston would get.

The New What Next

Shane McClanahan (12-7, 2.51 ERA) will get the start for Tampa Bay in the second game of the set, pitching opposite Cristian Javier (10-9, 2.65 ERA).

Shane McClanahan allowed four uncharacteristic runs on six hits and two walks over five innings on Sunday against Toronto. He struck out just striking out two batters. McClanahan was taken deep three times, including twice by George Springer. The southpaw had allowed just two home runs over his previous 38.2 innings of work. After producing two straight scoreless starts, McClanahan has been tagged with nine runs over his last two turns, raising his season ERA to 2.51 through 27 starts. Even so, he maintains a 3.01 FIP (2.53 xFIP), a 5.19 K/BB, and a 1.19 WHIP across 161.1 innings on the season. McClanahan gave up five runs on five hits (including a homer) across four innings in his previous start against Houston.

Cristian Javier allowed one hit over six scoreless innings against Baltimore on Sunday. He struck out eight. Javier retired the first 13 batters he faced and gave up just one single in the dominant outing. Javier has now turned in three consecutive scoreless outings — producing a 5.5 K/BB through 17 innings while lowering his season ERA to 2.65 (3.53 xFIP) during that stretch. He held the Rays scoreless over five innings in his previous start against Tampa Bay, surrendering one lone run. Key Matchups: Christian Bethancourt (1-2), David Peralta (2-7, 2B)

You can read about the series in our preview, while the starting lineup is below.

Rays 10/1/22 Starting Lineup

TBA

TNWN: Rays vs Astros — another series preview

It will become rather problematic in the postseason if you have a difficult time winning games away from the friendly confines of the Trop. (Photo Credit: X-Rays Spex)

After winning just one game in Cleveland, in a hard-fought and winnable series, the Tampa Bay Rays continue their season-ending road trip in Houston, where they start a three-game series against the Astros on Friday. The Astros are coming off a series split against the Diamondbacks.

At 85-71 on the season, the Rays enter play 14 games above .500, and with a magic number of one to clinch their fourth consecutive playoff spot.

On one hand, Tampa Bay lost a series and Houston split one. But on the other hand, both teams won just one of the contests in their respective previous series, so there’s that.

With the exception of a pinch-hit appearance in the series opener against the Guardians, the Rays have been without one of their best hitters, Yandy Díaz (shoulder), since September 19. It is absolutely baffling that they opted not to put him on the 10-day Injured List to give them a bit more roster flexibility while he is on the mend — you know, since as of Thursday he had effectively missed 10 days anyway — but that’s neither here nor now. What is relevant, though, is the gaping hole in the lineup without Díaz, who had been in the midst of a .316 BA/.418 OBP/.386 SLG/.804 OPS/.359 wOBA September 141 wRC+ prior to the injury. In four of the contests without his discerning eye in the batter’s box, Tampa Bay has been one big hit shy of a go-ahead lead, including the second and third games of the previous series. Take Thursday night’s loss for example.

The Rays worked the bases loaded on three one-out walks in the ninth inning. Yet, Ji-Man Choi — who, in all fairness, has been doing much better at the plate of late, and is among the league leaders in Barrel% over the last two weeks, boasting a 108 mph max exit velocity — struck out swinging, while Isaac Paredes popped out to second to end the contest. It’s the way the cookie crumbles I suppose, but it sure would be nice to get that ever crucial big hit when it matters the most … and they haven’t been getting it without Díaz in the lineup. Will we see him during this series? I have my doubts. If Díaz doesn’t end up on the IL today, he will likely ride the bench until the Boston series to get back up to speed.

Meanwhile, the Astros have been surprisingly unproductive the last week, slashing .236 BA/.306 OBP/.384 SLG/.690 OPS with an unlucky .268 BABIP, and a 97 wRC+. The Rays pitching staff, which limited Cleveland to just seven total runs (2.33 RPG), could be facing Houston at the perfect time. We all know what the Astros are capable of, offensively speaking, and if Tampa Bay’s corps of arms can stave them off for the next three days, the Rays could make this series at the other citrus fruit juice named stadium rather competitive.

Tampa Bay was swept by Houston in the previous series on September 19-21. Suffice it to say, they will be out for revenge this weekend.

Pitching Probables

Over the next three days, Kevin Cash will turn to Drew Rasmussen (10-7, 2.85 ERA), Shane McClanahan (12-7, 2.51 ERA), and Corey Kluber (10-9, 4.36 ERA). Dusty Baker will counter with Framber Valdez (16-5, 2.69 ERA), Cristian Javier (10-9, 2.65 ERA), and Luis Garcia (14-8, 3.81 ERA).

Drew Rasmussen allowed one run on three hits and two walks over 6.1 innings against the Blue Jays on Saturday. He struck out five. Rasmussen surrendered a double to Teoscar Hernandez in the seventh inning prior to exiting the game, so he was charged with one of the three runs from second baseman Whit Merrifield’s seventh-inning blast off left-handed reliever Brooks Raley. Rasmussen has recorded three consecutive losses, allowing nine runs in 16.1 innings over that span, although he was very good against the Jays. Overall he owns a 2.85 ERA and 3.22 FIP, with a 3.94 K/BB, and a 1.06 WHIP across 139.0 innings. Previously, Rasmussen allowed four runs on six hits (including a homer) and a walk to the Astros across six innings.

Framber Valdez allowed seven runs (four earned) on 11 hits and a walk over 5.1 innings against the Orioles on Saturday. He struck out six. Valdez allowed just three hits through the first three frames as the Astros jumped out to a 2-0 lead, yet things went awry for him in the fourth after he gave up back-to-back singles to lead off the inning. Rougned Odor later singled to drive in Adley Rutschman and Ramon Urias before Cedric Mullins topped off the inning with a two-run homer. Though the right-hander was charged with only four of the seven runs that came across while he was on the mound, it was still the first time all season that Valdez allowed more than three runs in an outing. It also snapped his big-league single-season record of 25 consecutive quality starts. Overall he owns a 2.69 ERA and 3.12 FIP, with a 2.89 K/BB, and a 1.14 WHIP across 191.0 innings. Valdez relies primarily on a 94 mph worm killer sinker that has some natural sinking action and a 79 mph curveball that has sweeping glove-side movement, while also mixing in an 83 mph slider that has exceptional depth, and an 89 mph hard changeup that dives down out of the zone. Key Matchups: Isaac Paredes (1-1, RBI), Harold Ramírez (1-1, 2B, RBI, 2 BB)

Shane McClanahan allowed four uncharacteristic runs on six hits and two walks over five innings on Sunday against Toronto. He struck out just striking out two batters. McClanahan was taken deep three times, including twice by George Springer. The southpaw had allowed just two home runs over his previous 38.2 innings of work. After producing two straight scoreless starts, McClanahan has been tagged with nine runs over his last two turns, raising his season ERA to 2.51 through 27 starts. Even so, he maintains a 3.01 FIP (2.53 xFIP), a 5.19 K/BB, and a 1.19 WHIP across 161.1 innings on the season. McClanahan gave up five runs on five hits (including a homer) across four innings in his previous start against Houston.

Cristian Javier allowed one hit over six scoreless innings against Baltimore on Sunday. He struck out eight. Javier retired the first 13 batters he faced and gave up just one single in the dominant outing. Javier has now turned in three consecutive scoreless outings — producing a 5.5 K/BB through 17 innings while lowering his season ERA to 2.65 (3.53 xFIP) during that stretch. He held the Rays scoreless over five innings in his previous start against Tampa Bay, surrendering one lone run. Key Matchups: Christian Bethancourt (1-2), David Peralta (2-7, 2B)

Corey Kluber got the start Tuesday and allowed three runs on eight hits and a walk while striking out five across four innings. All three runs against Kluber came with two outs when José Ramírez tripled in a run in the third inning and Steven Kwan hit a two-run single in the fourth. Kluber needed 91 pitches to get through the four frames and was removed rather than face the heart of Cleveland’s lineup a third time. It’s been feast or famine for the right-hander in September as he’s tossed seven innings while allowing one run or fewer on two occasions and given up 13 runs in 10.1 innings in his other three outings combined. All told, the BABIP bad-luck king (Kluber maintains a .316 BABIP on the season, 15 points higher than his career number) owns a 4.36 ERA but a 3.54 FIP, with a 6.75 K/BB, and a 1.21 WHIP across 159.0 frames. Kluber surrendered one run on six scattered hits and a walk across seven innings in his previous start against the Astros. While he was incredibly efficient, he only struck out two.

Luis Garcia allowed one run on four hits and no walks over six innings against the Diamondbacks on Tuesday. He struck out six. Garcia cruised to victory, as the only damage on the night came via a Geraldo Perdomo solo homer in the third inning. The effort was Garcia’s third quality start and second start without allowing a walk over 11 outings since the All-Star Break. He has a 3.81 ERA and a 4.00 FIP (3.84 xFIP) through 151.1 innings this season — just four innings shy of the innings mark he recorded in 2021. The baby rocker held the Rays scoreless across five innings in his previous start against Tampa Bay, surrendering just two hits while walking four. Key Matchups: Ji-Man Choi (1-2, HR, 3 RBI, BB), Wander Franco (2-6, 2B), Francisco Mejia (1-2, RBI), David Peralta (1-4, 2B), Harold Ramírez (2-4, 2B,)

Rays 9/29/22 pregame notes

Well, what do you know? The Guardians would’ve benefitted from a dome for the second night in a row. (Photo Credit: X-Rays Spex)

After dropping the second game of a three-game set in extra innings last night, 2-1, the Tampa Bay Rays look to win the series this afternoon.

At 85-70 on the season, the Rays enter play 15 games above .500, maintaining the second American League Wildcard spot by 0.5 games ahead of Seattle (1.5 games behind Toronto). With Baltimore playing earlier in the day, an Orioles loss would move Tampa Bay’s magic number down to one before the start of this afternoon’s contest in Cleveland.

Tyler Glasnow made his season debut on Wednesday and allowed one earned run on two hits (including a homer) and a walk while striking out three across three innings against the Guardians. Glasnow threw 50 pitches (32 strikes, 64% strike rate). He topped out at 99.4 mph on his fastball and averaged 98.1 mph — which would be his highest velocity across an entire season. The right-hander recorded his first strikeout in the second inning on an 84 mph cut-slider that ran down and in to Josh Naylor. His only blemish came in that inning when he missed on a fastball that Gabriel Arias turned on for his first career home run. Glasnow is expected to make another start before the close of the regular season and figures to serve a prominent role in the Rays’ postseason run.

The New What Next

Jeffrey Springs (9-4, 2.56 ERA) will get the start in the series finale, pitching opposite Cal Quantrill (14-5, 3.49 ERA).

Jeffrey Springs got the start Friday, although he exited after five innings of work after giving up four runs (three earned) on six hits. Staked to a three-run lead in the fifth, Springs — who previously held Toronto scoreless across two starts this season — gave up back-to-back doubles to Teoscar Hernandez and Raimel Tapia. After a fly-out, Springs walked Danny Jansen. After getting Goerge Springer to strikeout, the hurler served up three consecutive singles, all driving in a run to put the Jays up by a run, if but temporarily. On the season, Springs now maintains a 2.56 ERA and 3.35 FIP, with a 4.53 K/BB, and a 1.10 WHIP across 126.1 innings. Springs surrendered three runs on six hits (including a home run) across five innings in his previous start against Cleveland.

Cal Quantrill allowed one run on five hits over six innings against the Rangers on Friday. He struck out four and walked three. Quantrill was solid for six frames outside of a solo home run he served up to Marcus Semien in the third. The right-hander did walk two batters in the fifth inning but managed to escape without allowing any damage. Quantrill has now won his last 10 decisions and has allowed two earned runs or fewer in five of his last seven starts. He maintains a 3.49 ERA and a 4.26 FIP on the season, with a 1.24 WHIP, and a 2.55 K/BB, over 175.1 innings. Quantrill relies primarily on an 89 mph cutter that has some natural sink and a 94 mph sinker that has a little natural sink, while also mixing in a 94 mph four-seam fastball, and a firm 85 mph changeup. Key Matchups: Christian Bethancourt (1-3, 2B), Yandy Díaz (2-3, 3B), Wander Franco (1-3), David Peralta (2-2), José Siri (2-2, 2B)

You can read about the series in our preview, while the starting lineup is below.

Rays 9/29/22 Starting Lineup

  1. Aranda 2B
  2. Arozarena RF
  3. Franco SS
  4. Ramírez DH
  5. Peralta LF
  6. Margot CF
  7. Choi 1B
  8. Paredes 3B
  9. Mejía C

Noteworthiness

— The Rays are expected to promote Easton McGee today; figure he’ll likely pitch in tandem with starter Jeffrey Springs. McGee is regarded to have the best command across all of the minors, boasting a 1.6 BB/9, placing him in the 99th percentile. McGee has a deep arsenal, and he relies on a low 90’s heavy sinker/two-seam fastball, a changeup which he tunnels with his sinker, and a sweeping slider. He also has a cutter and a four-seam fastball.

LBWMF: Rays 6, Guardians 5

They could’ve used one of these in Cleveland last night. (Photo Credit: X-Rays Spex)

The Tampa Bay Rays eked out an extra-inning win on Tuesday thanks to Harold Ramírez, who drove in a pair of runs on a clutch double. The Rays ended the night with a magic number of three to punch their postseason ticket for the fourth consecutive season.

At 85-69 on the season, Tampa Bay enters play 16 games over .500 and sandwiched between Toronto and Seattle (by 1.5 games) for the second American League Wildcard spot.

Corey Kluber got the start Tuesday and allowed three runs on eight hits and a walk while striking out five across four innings. All three runs against Kluber came with two outs when José Ramírez tripled in a run in the third inning and Steven Kwan hit a two-run single in the fourth. Kluber needed 91 pitches to get through the four frames and was removed rather than face the heart of Cleveland’s lineup a third time. It’s been feast or famine for the right-hander in September as he’s tossed seven innings while allowing one run or fewer on two occasions and given up 13 runs in 10.1 innings in his other three outings combined. All told, the BABIP bad-luck king (Kluber maintains a .316 BABIP on the season, 15 points higher than his career number) owns a 4.36 ERA but a 3.54 FIP, with a 6.75 K/BB, and a 1.21 WHIP across 159.0 frames.

Down by a run in the fourth, Tampa Bay answered the Guardians against Shane Bieber. Wander Franco sparked the rally with a leadoff double and moved up to third on the coresponding throw back into the infield. Harold Ramírez followed with a game-tying double.

Tampa Bay scored the next three runs in the inning with two outs. Christian Bethancourt singled to keep the rally alive for José Siri, who hit a three-run homer to left to put them up by three.

Be that as it may, Cleveland’s pitching staff buckled down for the next six frames and did not allow a batter to reach base until the 11th inning. Meanwhile, the Guardians chipped away at the Rays’ lead and ultimately tied things up in the eighth.

If you’re still wondering how pitch number six went for ball four and not strike three, you’re not alone.

As mentioned above, Cleveland fought back for a pair of runs in the bottom of the fourth, then tied the game against Jason Adam in the eighth. Adam issued a one-out walk (with a little help from home plate umpire Mark Carlson) to Gabriel Arias, who subsequently swiped second. After a groundout moved Arias up to third, the speedy Myles Straw grounded to short and was initially ruled out at first. Yet, the play was challenged and the call was overturned.

Tied at four in the 11th, Tampa Bay took the go-ahead lead against Trevor Stephan. With Taylor Walls as the ghost runner at second, Franco walked to bring Ramírez into the batter’s box. Ramírez fell behind but went to work and ultimately a grounder down the third base line to score both runners and make it 6-4.

The Guardians got one run back against Calvin Faucher, who then slammed the door shut for the win.

The New What Next

Tyler Glasnow (0-0, 1.29 ERA at Triple-A) will make his triumphant return to the mound on Wednesday, pitching opposite Triston McKenzie (11-11, 3.04 ERA).

Tyler Glasnow, in his first post-Tommy John surgery return to the bump, will be limited to about 45 pitches (2-3 innings or 10-12 batters). It is possible he could log four or five innings if he stays on turn and pitches the following week in Boston. In his most recent start, on Friday, Glasnow put up a 2.2 IP/0 H/1 BB/6K line on 46 pitches (26 strikes, 57% strike rate). The right-hander fell behind four of the last six hitters, yet he rallied to retire three of the four. Overall, his fastball sat in the 97-98 mph range across his four rehab outings, his curveball was sharp, and his cut slider boasted a ton of deception. All told, he allowed just one run on one hit and four walks (the first three walks came in his first rehab outing) with 14 combined strikeouts across 14 frames.

Triston McKenzie allowed two runs on six hits over eight innings against the White Sox on Wednesday. He struck out 13. McKenzie allowed his runs in the form of a fourth-inning home run off the bat of third baseman Yoan Moncada and a seventh-inning RBI single from Gavin Sheets. The right-hander has thrown seven innings or more eight times in his last 15 starts. In addition, he has generated a lot of whiffs during his last seven outings, recording 56 strikeouts over 45.2 innings. Overall, he maintains a 3.04 ERA and a 3.72 FIP on the season, with a 0.96 WHIP, and a 4.19 K/BB, over 180.1 innings. McKenzie relies primarily on a 93 mph four-seam fastball with good “rising” action, a hard 87 mph slider, and an 80 mph curveball with 12-6 movement. Key Matchups: Randy Arozarena (1-3), Christian Bethancourt (1-3, 2B), Wander Franco (1-3, 2B), Isaac Paredes (1-3)

You can read about the series in our preview, while the starting lineup is below.

Rays 9/28/22 Starting Lineup

  1. Margot RF
  2. Arozarena LF
  3. Franco SS
  4. Ramírez DH
  5. Choi 1B
  6. Paredes 3B
  7. Bethancourt C
  8. Walls 2B
  9. Siri CF

TNWN: Rays vs Guardians: a series preview, part deux

After splitting the final home series of the regular season with the Blue Jays, the Tampa Bay Rays departed for their final road trek of the 2022 campaign. The first stop is Cleveland, where they’ll start a three-game series against the Guardians on Tuesday.

At 84-69 0n the season, the Rays enter play 15 games above .500 and running third in the American League East. They hold a 0.5-game lead over the Seattle Mariners for the second AL Wildcard spot with a magic number of five and nine games left to play.

It was an awkward series for the Rays against the Blue Jays. Tampa Bay ran the table offensively across the first two contests, putting up 22 runs against Toronto’s pitching staff. Yet, they crossed the plate just twice on Saturday and Sunday. Granted, they were outmatched against Alek Manoah on the 24th, but the Rays did have their chances in the series finale. The BABIP luck dragons, however, actively worked against them. Tampa Bay boasted a .334 xBA against starter Ross Stripling, against whom they barreled up the ball nine times. More often than not, though, those barreled up balls found gloves and Tampa Bay ended the day with a frustrating one run on seven hits, and with a .292 BABIP despite putting 28 balls in play — many of which were hot off the bat.

Over the last week, the Rays put up a sub-average .226 BA/.310 OBP/.335 SLG/.645 OPS line, with a 91 wRC+ and a -4.6 wRAA. A line like that will not be tenable against a team like the Guardians, who has performed 31% better over the last week thanks to a .270 BA/.337 OBP/.456 SLG/.793 OPS slash line, with a 122 wRC+, and a 6.7 wRAA. Cleveland continues to do what it’s wont to do: put the ball in play, walk at a decent clip, and not strike out. All told, Cleveland is in the midst of a seven-game win streak and has won 13 of the last 15 contests.

The Rays dropped two of three to the Guardians previously, while Cleveland put up a +3 run differential and 4.33 runs per game against Tampa Bay’s pitching staff.

Pitching Probables

Over the next three days, Kevin Cash will turn to Corey Kluber (10-9, 4.30 ERA), Tyler Glasnow (0-0, 1.29 ERA at Triple-A) in his triumphant return to the mound, and Jeffrey Springs (9-4, 2.56 ERA). Terry Francona will counter with Shane Bieber (12-8, 2.81 ERA), Triston McKenzie (11-11, 3.04 ERA), and Cal Quantrill (14-5, 3.49 ERA).

Corey Kluber tossed a seven-inning gem against Houston on Wednesday, allowing up one run on six hits and a walk while striking out two. Kluber went seven strong, relinquishing just a run on Aledmys Diaz’s first-inning single. The right-hander rebounded well after a couple of tough starts, producing his fifth quality start in his last seven turns. Kluber now owns a 4.30 ERA and a 3.59 FIP on the season, with a 6.84 K/BB, a 1.18 WHIP, and 130 punchouts over 155 innings. Kluber surrendered four runs on eight hits (including one home run) across six innings in his previous start against his former team.

Shane Bieber allowed two runs on seven hits and no walks while striking out five batters across 7.2 strong innings against the White Sox on Thursday. Bieber yielded a run in the first inning but didn’t allow Chicago to get back on the scoreboard until Gavin Sheets took him deep for a solo shot in the eighth. The right-handed hurler ended up with his fourth consecutive win and his 11th consecutive quality start. Over that 11-game stretch, Bieber has posted an impressive 1.75 ERA and 8.78 K/BB along with an 8-2 record across 77.1 frames. Overall, he maintains a 2.81 ERA and a 2.87 FIP on the season, with a 1.03 WHIP, and a 5.40 K/BB over 189.0 innings. Bieber allowed one run on five scattered hits and two walks across seven strong innings in his previous start against the Rays. Key Matchups: Ji-Man Choi (5-13, 2 2B, RBI, 2 BB), Yandy Díaz (1-4)

Tyler Glasnow, in his first post-Tommy John surgery return to the bump, will be limited to about 45 pitches (2-3 innings or 10-12 batters). It is possible he could log four or five innings if he stays on turn and pitches the following week in Boston. In his most recent start, on Friday, Glasnow put up a 2.2 IP/0 H/1 BB/6K line on 46 pitches (26 strikes, 57% strike rate). The right-hander fell behind four of the last six hitters, yet he rallied to retire three of the four. Overall, his fastball sat in the 97-98 mph range across his four rehab outings, his curveball was sharp, and his cut slider boasted a ton of deception. All told, he allowed just one run on one hit and four walks (the first three walks came in his first rehab outing) with 14 combined strikeouts across 14 frames.

Triston McKenzie allowed two runs on six hits over eight innings against the White Sox on Wednesday. He struck out 13. McKenzie allowed his runs in the form of a fourth-inning home run off the bat of third baseman Yoan Moncada and a seventh-inning RBI single from Gavin Sheets. The right-hander has thrown seven innings or more eight times in his last 15 starts. In addition, he has generated a lot of whiffs during his last seven outings, recording 56 strikeouts over 45.2 innings. Overall, he maintains a 3.04 ERA and a 3.72 FIP on the season, with a 0.96 WHIP, and a 4.19 K/BB, over 180.1 innings. McKenzie relies primarily on a 93 mph four-seam fastball with good “rising” action, a hard 87 mph slider, and an 80 mph curveball with 12-6 movement. Key Matchups: Randy Arozarena (1-3), Christian Bethancourt (1-3, 2B), Wander Franco (1-3, 2B), Isaac Paredes (1-3)

Jeffrey Springs got the start Friday, although he exited after five innings of work after giving up four runs (three earned) on six hits. Staked to a three-run lead in the fifth, Springs — who previously held Toronto scoreless across two starts this season — gave up back-to-back doubles to Teoscar Hernandez and Raimel Tapia. After a fly-out, Springs walked Danny Jansen. After getting Goerge Springer to strikeout, the hurler served up three consecutive singles, all driving in a run to put the Jays up by a run, if but temporarily. On the season, Springs now maintains a 2.56 ERA and 3.35 FIP, with a 4.53 K/BB, and a 1.10 WHIP across 126.1 innings. Springs surrendered three runs on six hits (including a home run) across five innings in his previous start against Cleveland.

Cal Quantrill allowed one run on five hits over six innings against the Rangers on Friday. He struck out four and walked three. Quantrill was solid for six frames outside of a solo home run he served up to Marcus Semien in the third. The right-hander did walk two batters in the fifth inning but managed to escape without allowing any damage. Quantrill has now won his last 10 decisions and has allowed two earned runs or fewer in five of his last seven starts. He maintains a 3.49 ERA and a 4.26 FIP on the season, with a 1.24 WHIP, and a 2.55 K/BB, over 175.1 innings. Quantrill relies primarily on an 89 mph cutter that has some natural sink and a 94 mph sinker that has a little natural sink, while also mixing in a 94 mph four-seam fastball, and a firm 85 mph changeup. Key Matchups: Christian Bethancourt (1-3, 2B), Yandy Díaz (2-3, 3B), Wander Franco (1-3), David Peralta (2-2), José Siri (2-2, 2B)